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Sunday, Feb 28, 2021

Mars & Venus

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Analysis

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6 min

Prisoners of Their Own Propaganda: Russian Narratives Projected Into the ‘Near Abroad’

Promoting propaganda narratives has become an important part of Moscow’s foreign policy toolbox. While their immediate goal may be to confuse foreign audiences, these narratives are ultimately rooted in a particular worldview, that is, in fact, shared by many Russians. Therefore, we should not underestimate the extent to which the Kremlin and its supporters may actually be prisoners of their own propaganda.

Aliaksei Kazharski

picture alliance/dpa/Sputnik | Maksim Bogodvid

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AUTHOR

Aliaksei Kazharski

Visegrad Insight Fellow. Researcher at the Institute of European Studies and International Relations of the Comenius University in Bratislava and a lecturer at the Department of Security Studies of Charles University in Prague.

PUBLISHER

Visegrad Insight describes itself as "the main Central European platform of debate and analysis that generates future policy directions for Europe and transatlantic partners". It is led by accomplished editors from the Visegrád Group countries: the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. It was established in 2012 by the Res Publica Foundation - an independent think tank in Warsaw.

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